Albert and Kansadie Weems

 

My mother who has spent her life giving back to others, while living a modest life herself. In many instances, today’s fast-paced world leaves little room for others. This article is a short chronology of the life of my mother and the loving care she given her mother, my grandmother. I hope that you find it eye-opening, and that it makes you ask yourself, how much do I love my mother?

After working for 30 years as a public school teacher in Cartersville, Ga., and working with my father to putting three children through college, Kansadie Weems retired in 1992. Retirement is often referred to as the golden years, a time to sit back, relax and enjoy life.  However, literally months after my mother retired, my grandmother was diagnosed with early stage dementia and was unable to care for herself. So as the good and dutiful daughter, my mother took her in and began to care for her around the clock. If you have never experienced caring for an aging adult firsthand, you have no idea what physical demands are placed on your body. Not to mention the mental and emotional challenges you experience from seeing your parent decline on a daily basis.

My mother is only one example of a growing trend that is taking place across America, mature children taking care of their elderly parents. My mother never complains, even though she is chained to her house day-in and day-out, except for the brief moments when she goes out to shop for household necessities. With a cost of almost $200 per day for 24 hour in-home health care workers, it is virtually impossible for her to ever leave town for a vacation.

My grandmother will be 103 years old this December, and I know without the loving care of my mother for the past 20 years, since her retirement, odds are razor slim that she would still be with us today. Happy Mother’s Day, Mom. I love you very much for all you do and the example you’ve given Kandance, Kim and me to live by. –al weems