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Detroit Recovery Project Opens 5th Location to Help Those Battling Addictions

Mon., Jun. 20, 2011 11:27 PM EDT
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DETROIT — “Many people focus on the fiscal problems we face [in Detroit].. social issues such as substance abuse, mental illness and physical health have a tremendous negative impact on [our] ability to move forward as well,” said Andre Johnson, president and CEO of Detroit Recovery Project (DRP), Inc. State officials and Wayne County human service professionals congregated recently for the launch of an outreach facility geared to fight substance abuse in Detroit. DRP, its fifth location now at 1145 W. Grand Blvd., is an acclaimed nonprofit organization providing support services for alcohol and drug dependency, family re-integration, job training and outpatient treatment. The program aims to decrease relapse rates and enhance the ability to achieve long-term success.

As Sam Cooke permeates throughout the facility, colors and portraits of African culture are proudly displayed. Affirmations are elevated to represent an onward and upward glance to recovery. Volunteers, administration and residents of the community were visible and vocal during the ribbon-cutting ceremony. Exuding dedication to Detroit and its members, many spoke highly of DRP’s leadership. Johnson said that DRP is in operation to lend a helping hand to those who require ongoing care after the traditional 30-60 days in a residential recovery center.

An unstable economy, loss of income and housing contribute to an increase in drug usage. Roughly 14,000 Detroiters enter drug abuse treatment programs every year, with a relapse rate of 70 percent. DRP, a partner for a Drug-Free Detroit, warmly welcomes referrals from neighboring facilities. The facility focuses on five main services: recovery management or coaching, prevention in active community transitions (PACT), women in recovery enhancement development (WIRED), love for Detroit youth and support groups.

“Addiction is not to be taken lightly,” said Dr. Calvin Trent, retired director of the Bureau of Substance Abuse Prevention while addressing drug issues in Detroit and the United States. Jails and prisons are filled with “petty dealers” for charges associated with marijuana; despite the fact it is practically legalized. Others are in dire need of assistance with overcoming addictions.

According to the State of Michigan Office of Drug Control Policy, 52 percent of those seeking substance abuse treatment in Detroit do not have income; 50 percent lack stable housing; 35 percent have less than a high school education; and 9 percent were employed in 2005. Project Helping Hands, a program also associated with the Detroit Recovery Project, assists the chronically homeless in Detroit’s central district. Mental health and drug abuse recovery specialists provide shelter and services to the homeless, rather than the common alternative of jail. The center also offers HIV and Hepatitis A and B testing, and results are available in 15 to 20 minutes. Other areas of assistance are GED classes and training in defense, meditation and technology.-megan mccolla

For more information about the Detroit Recovery Project, call (313) 365-3100, or visit the website at http://www.recovery4detroit.com.

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