West Coast rap collective Odd Future Wolf Gang Kill Them All, better known as Odd Future, has angered the LGBT community on a number of occasions thanks to their front man, Tyler, The Creator. But unbeknownst to most, the group’s sole female member, Syd The Kyd, is a proud lesbian who recently came out to the public in The Internet’s “Cocaine” video, in which she goes on a date with a girl at a carnival. And in a recent Odd Future cover story for LA Weekly, Syd explains why she chose to come out as well her thoughts on suspected lesbians in hip-hop.

In the article, Syd explains that she was inspired to come out in the video because of her lack of lesbian mentors and idols, saying she wanted to be a source of inspiration for other lesbians.

“I decided to do it because I wish I had someone like that [an openly gay female artist] while I was coming up. People write on my Tumblr just thanking me for making the video, saying that I really inspire them, and they want to be like me,” said Syd. “But I wasn’t always this way, this comfortable with myself, and I remember what that was like. So I figure, f–k it. Everyday people aren’t given this opportunity and I realize that. And I didn’t at first. I thought I was just lucky to be along for the ride.”

While discussing lesbianism in hip-hop, Syd also made mention of several women in the genre whom she believes are hiding their sexuality from the public.

“There’s Alicia Keys, who’s married to Swizz Beatz — we know that s–t ain’t real,” she said. “You got Queen Latifah kissing Common in movies. Missy Elliott saying she don’t wanna hang with b—-es. You know she loves her some b—-es.”

Colorful language aside, it’s promising to see Syd feels free to open up her life and her sexuality to the public in a genre that has historically discriminated against the LGBT community. Perhaps, along with the help of other hip-hop emcees like Kanye West, Nicki Minaj and Russell Simmons, hip-hop will include more openly gay and bisexual mainstream artists. Below, let’s explore some suspected lesbians in hip-hop.

nicholas robinson

 

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