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David Lee Edwards blew $27 million and died broke 12 years after hitting the lottery. According to a report by the Daily Mail, Edwards, 58, died alone in a hospice on Nov. 30.

In 2001, Edwards hit the lottery during a time when he was unemployed while living in South Florida. But soon as he got his first check, Edwards went on an insane spending spree.

He bought a $1.6 million house in Palm Beach Gardens; paid $1.9 million for a Lear Jet; bought another home for $600,000; bought three losing race horses; invested $4.5 million in a fiber optics company and limo business; he paid his ex-wife $500,000 for custody of his teenage daughter; bought a $200,000 Lamborghini Diablo and a multitude of other cars; bought a $35,000 Hummer golf cart for his daughter; paid for a $159,000 ring; and paid $30,000 for a plasma screen TV.

In the first three months of winning the lottery, Edwards spent $3 million. At the end of his first year as a lottery winner, he had spent $12 million. By 2006, he had spent nearly all of his money.

Edwards, a felon before winning the lottery, continued to struggle with drug addiction after losing  all of his money. He lost both of his homes and was forced to live in a storage unit that was infested with human feces.

Edwards’ wife drove him to his home state of Kentucky where he lived in a hospice until he passed away.

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  • Arthur McDonald

    Sad…”the poor ye shall have with you always”…

  • Rebecca Williams

    Yikes, that was insane

  • Crazie Flawed Narcissistic-Vam

    SMH….control your vices or they will control you.

  • nunyabidnessfoo

    holy shit… how can people be so foolish

  • deanerick

    sure it was a good 12 years. i would do it somewhat different, lol, including living in a storage unit filled with feces….

    • Mildred Pierce

      The money didn’t last 12 years. Mr. Edwards was broke within 5 years of winning.

  • Lorenzo Chaps

    I remember seeing his “riches” story and he said he made like $45K+ a month in interest alone on his money. I don’t doubt it at all, but obviously something went wrong later. I’m all for investing, but fly by night companies or bright ideas where you’re putting up all or most of the money is a quick way to being broke. I can’t condemn or condone his spending because we each have an idea of what we want, foolish or otherwise.

    The houses were the smartest investment; the fiber optics were probably the worst. If you’re going to invest in a business, please know that industry like the back of your hand. What a sad way to go out. He still managed to live a life, briefly, that most of us will never know anything about. I suppose you can’t really feel bad or be sad for him.

  • Venator

    What a gaudy room he is standing in. No taste what so ever.

  • kelly

    i saw him on the lottery winners documentary .and i notice then he was outta control , i can not under stand how a man can spend 27 million dollar even in a life time he was just greedy and stupid … in the documentary it was clear he had struggle with drugs or something .he seem edgy … and unrealixt om this is just sad……. and his family could do nothing to help him ,,im sure lawyers got some of it too… how did he die i wonder ? so sad ..we always want to win the lottery but what would we do if we didnt have dreams of what tommorow can bring … the bible said a fool and his money shall soon depart ..it was not joking

    • Sammy

      I remember that doc, too! He gave a tour of his home and among all of the junk and trinkets furnishing his home, he proudly displayed a gaudy samurai sword — which seemed more decorative than authentic.

      I found this posting Googling, “Lottery winners have no taste.”

      That’s cuz I’m watching “The Lottery Changed My Life” and I’m fascinated. While their mansions have stunning curb appeal, the camera goes inside the mansion…and the place looks like a trailer home — complete with corduroy La-Z-Boy recliners. It’s amazing how lottery winners usually are missing two things: taste…and teeth. God Bless Them All, though! And a little more for Mr. Edwards. His is a sorry story… Good Luck becomes hard luck.

    • Mildred Pierce

      We probably saw the same documentary. If I remember correctly, Mr. Edwards stood out compared to the other winners because he was the only one who said how much he paid for everything. He paid thousands of dollars for something that was probably worth $100 if that much. I think it was some ugly sculpture he had on a table. After I saw that documentary, he was on another one about lottery losers – those who spent all their money and were broke. By the way, “a fool and his money are soon parted” is not in the Bible but it is a true statement.

  • Mildred Pierce

    The only smart thing Mr. Edwards did was hire a financial advisor. But he didn’t heed the advise. One of the things the financial advisor told him to do was to not spend so much money and to not gamble. If he only listened to the advisor, he probably would have not been broke within 5 years and probably still would have been worth millions when he died. He lived in gated community in Florida which required homeowner association dues. Mr. Edwards failed to pay the dues which he claimed he didn’t know about and lost his $1+ million home for a measly $5,000 in back association dues. His daughter drove a golf cart to school. I’m sure the other kids (who drove actual cars) were thinking what a trailer rat she was. After Mr. Edwards and his wife lost their home, they lived in a warehouse where they stored their possessions. Although there was a working bathroom, the Edwards’ chose to defecate on the floor and drug paraphernalia was strewn throughout the warehouse. Their items were later auctioned off. Really awful stuff.

  • Adrian Whiteley

    no cure for stupid.

  • mohamed zineddine

    yes . it sure this lotery because it was a good in 12 years.. the poor people will be have his chance to change his life too.