Ginnie Crawford is one of the top hurdlers in the world. The two-time U.S. national champion is currently training for the 2012 U.S. Olympic trials, which will take place in June.

Along with her rigorous training schedule, Crawford serves as an ambassador for the American Diabetes Association and takes time to teach about the importance of eating healthy and remaining fit.

During a break from training, Crawford spoke with rolling out sports about improving her chances to make the U.S. Olympic team and her commitment to fighting diabetes. –amir shaw

When did you fall in love with track and field?

I got involved with track at 8 years old. I had a lot of energy as a child. My parents took my twin brother and I to a community center in Seattle and we loved it from the jump. I was winning a lot of track meets at a young age and I stuck with it.

How are you preparing for the U.S. Olympic trials?

To prepare for the Olympic trials, I’m focused more on speed work and my hurdle techniques. I also focused on gaining more strength and being totally fit. I’ve been getting a lot of rest and perfecting my strengths.

How did you get involved with the American Diabetes Association?

I’ve always been into health. My older sister passed at 34 in 2009. She had diabetes and other complications. She went into a diabetic coma. That’s something that’s dear to me. I want people to be aware of it. My sister found out about it when she was young and probably was in denial about it. Diabetes forces you to change your whole lifestyle. You can’t drink alcohol or eat bad food anymore.

How are you spreading the message of healthy lifestyles?

I’m encouraging kids to educate themselves. I’m teaching the effects food has on their bodies. They need to be aware of what they’re eating. Staying active and eating right will help you in the long [term]. You also want to be active, not sitting around playing video games all day.