Chicago rapper Dreezy talks violence, injustice and ‘From Now On’

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The Chicago rap seen has been burgeoning for the past few years. The interesting thing about rap music is all of the sub genres that exist. In Chicago these sub genres are even more segregated by areas of the city. The South Side of Chicago has birthed a specific sound many coin as drill but has evolved since it hit the scene a few years back. One of the artists who has assisted in this evolution is Seandrea Sledge aka Dreezy.

Dreezy has developed a substantial buzz in the industry after dropping her Chiraq remix over a year ago. Her song “Body” featuring Chicago native Jeremih was recently leaked and is causing a firestorm online. We caught up with Dreezy at a listening party for her most recent release “From Now On.” We spoke about her influences and her thoughts on speaking out against injustice.

Tell us who you are.
I’m Dreezy. Multi-talended artist, trend-setter, big sister, and a role model.

What influenced you to pick up a microphone?
I’ve been writing since I was a kid. I started off writing poems and stories. I joined a jazz band in school and started scatting and singing. I ended up rapping around my freshmen year of high school, and have been blowing steam ever since. It’s always been my way of expressing myself and getting some energy off.

What would you say is the most challenging thing about being an artist?
It’s staying current but also staying true to yourself. The wave of music and sounds change every year, so I’ve been working on new ways to capture people’s attention, but still give them who Dreezy really is. I enjoy being able to give my audience what they need to hear in a way they’ll listen.

What are your thoughts on the violence going on in Chicago from the perspective of Black on Black violence to police on citizen violence?
As far as Black on Black violence, I don’t condone it but I’m definitely aware of what’s going on. A lot of our Black communities are suffering. People within our communities are poor and have no hope or inspiration to leave; they don’t have work experience, and lack support needed to thrive. I just pray that they can some day overcome the odds and be able to show a better example of who and what they can be as a whole, but they cannot do that without adequate resources. As far as police violence, I think it’s unfair and ignorant for officers who’ve sworn to serve and protect, to use their authority to kill citizens by means of excessive force, mainly the Black race. It takes away all trust built and will only cause more drama. Life is a valuable thing right now more than ever. We all have to be accountable in the end, so I pray for world peace overall.

Do artists have a moral obligation to speak out on injustice?
If you’re in a position of power and have the influence to make a positive change in anybody/anything, you should take advantage of that. Not because it’s an obligation, but because it’s the right thing to do. Blessings create more blessings, and the voice of one person can change thousands of lives. Speak up for what’s right, always.

What is in the works for 2016?
I’ve been working a lot on my album and with other artists and producers whose work I love. I plan on dropping my first single with Jeremih in early January, and I have a lot more big records on the way. In the meantime, I just released my first official EP called “From Now On” on iTunes, produced by 808 Mafia’s Southside and Metro Boomin. So I’m feeling real good about this new year. I’m ready to take off.

Tell us about your collaboration with Dej Loaf … how did that happen?
I linked up with Dej a couple times before the feature happened, just supporting her and her movement. After I signed with Interscope, my label put the record together and surprised me with it. We met up with her in Atlanta and shot the video as soon as we both were free, and that was that. Dej is a dope person and artist to me anyway.

What encouraging words do you have for our readers?
Master what you’re good at. Don’t be afraid to take risks. Never settle for less. Never forget to appreciate life and the people who love you. Stay humble and thankful. You will win.

http://www.audiomack.com/album/dreezy/from-now-on

 

Eddy "Precise" Lamarre
Eddy "Precise" Lamarre

Eddy Lamarre aka Precise is a father, emcee, motivational speaker, blogger and performing artist. Follow his blog at precisemuzic.com



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