Blacks who are leading in science, technology and innovation

Dr. Shirley Ann Jackson is the President of Rennsselaer Polytechnic Institute in New York. (Credit: Lonny Kalfus/Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute)
Dr. Shirley Ann Jackson is the President of Rennsselaer Polytechnic Institute in New York. (Credit: Lonny Kalfus/Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute)

On Friday, Jan. 22, President Barack Obama will award National Medals of Science and National Medals of Technology and Innovation to 17 scientists, engineers, mathematicians, and innovators. Awarded annually, the Medal of Science recognizes individuals who have made outstanding contributions to science, engineering, and mathematics. The National Medal of Technology and Innovation recognizes those who have made lasting contributions to America’s competitiveness and quality of life and helped strengthen the nation’s technological workforce.

“Science and technology are fundamental to solving some of our Nation’s biggest challenges,” President Obama said. “The knowledge produced by these Americans today will carry our country’s legacy of innovation forward and continue to help countless others around the world. Their work is a testament to American ingenuity.”

Cato T. Laurencin, M.D., Ph.D., Vice President for Health Affairs and Dean of the School of Medicine in his lab at the UConn Health Center. (Credit: Lanny Nagler for UConn Health Center)
Cato T. Laurencin, M.D., Ph.D., Vice President for Health Affairs and Dean of the School of Medicine in his lab at the UConn Health Center. (Credit: Lanny Nagler for UConn Health Center)

The National Medal of Science was created by statute in 1959 and is administered for the White House by the National Science Foundation. Awarded annually, the Medal recognizes individuals who have made outstanding contributions to science and engineering. The President receives nominations from a committee of Presidential appointees based on their extraordinary knowledge in and contributions to chemistry, engineering, computing, mathematics, and the biological, behavioral/social, and physical sciences.

The National Medal of Technology and Innovation was created by statute in 1980 and is administered for the White House by the U.S. Department of Commerce’s Patent and Trademark Office. The award recognizes those who have made lasting contributions to America’s competitiveness and quality of life and helped strengthen the Nation’s technological workforce. A distinguished, independent committee representing the private and public sectors submits recommendations to the President.

Among the 17 are Dr. Shirley Ann Jackson, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in New York, and Dr. Cato T. Laurencin, University of Connecticut in Connecticut.

Click here for the entire list.

Yvette Caslin
Yvette Caslin

I'm a writer, image architect & significance marketer. Love photojournalism, creative expression & originality.



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