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Morehouse man, CEO of Detroit Recovery Project, to be honored at White House

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Andre L. Johnson, president and CEO Detroit Recovery Project to be honored by the White House as a “Champion of Change.” (Photo credit: Hobson Media Group)

From Morehouse to the White House, Andre L. Johnson is the epitome of a champion of change. That’s why it’s befitting for him to be honored at the White House as one of 10 Champions of Change for his work as president and CEO of the Detroit Recovery Project. The Obama administration created the Champions of Change program as a way to recognize “individuals doing extraordinary things to empower and inspire members of their communities.” This prestigious recognition is being awarded to those who have made an extraordinary difference by advancing substance abuse prevention, treatment and recovery. Johnson was selected as an honoree from over 920 people nominated.

The 46-year-old native Detroiter founded DRP in 2005 to aid his community in preventing substance abuse, improving access to treatment and supporting recovery. A former user himself that has been in recovery for over 28 years, Johnson felt the need to give back to his community and help others in their own recovery journey. DRP does just that by providing peer-led, peer-run, and peer-driven services out of two main campuses, located on the east side and west side of Detroit. DRP has successfully provided treatment services for the past ten years, mainly due to Johnson’s leadership in securing over $15 million in federal, county, state, and local grants.

“From Detroit to his work overseas, Andre has chosen to dedicate his talents to serve the American people. We look forward to honoring Andre’s work as a Champion of Change,” said White House Senior Advisor Valerie Jarrett, who will represent the administration at the ceremony, along with Director of National Drug Control Policy Michael Botticelli and U.S. Surgeon General Vivek Murthy.

Johnson, who was appointed by the U.S. secretary of Health and Human Services to serve on the Substance Abuse Mental Health Service Administration/Center for Substance Abuse Treatment National Advisory Council, is extremely humbled and incredibly grateful for this honor. He credits his team and his amazing board of directors for helping DRP with their continued success over the years. “I fight this good fight every day so that you can live in a drug-free community,” he said.