One of the world’s most popular sedans, the Toyota Camry was originally designed in 1983 and since then, has become ubiquitous combining reliability and affordability. This summer, at a ride-and-drive press event for East Coast media outlets, Toyota revealed the 2018 Camry for the first time, as well as the all-new 2018 C-HR.

The 2018 Camry boasts several new updates and features, making it a competitive choice in the market of sedans. Made evident from a presentation by Toyota’s own engineering representatives, the Camry was redesigned from top-to-bottom and features changes all the way from the car’s interior design to its convenience and technology features.

The new TNGA platform, which stands for Toyota New Global Architecture, underpins the structural redesign of the Toyota Camry. The TNGA initiative has been in effect since 2015 and gives certain Toyota and Lexus models a better driving experience by in providing different front, rear, and all-wheel drive configurations and a lower center of gravity for better control and handling over the car while driving.

Some of the best new features for the 2018 Camry include the 3.5-liter V6 engine, Safety Sense Technology, the 10-inch color head-up display, the 8″ touch-screen display, improved JBL Audio with a 10″ sub-woofer, and EnTune 3.0, Toyota’s comprehensive and modern “info-tainment” suite that provides in-car WiFi and is standard across all new Camrys.

Also, after a test ride at this event, it’s clear that Toyota put a new emphasis on the level of comfort that the 2018 Camry offers. While space and leg room have always been a challenge for mid-size sedans, the new Camry offers a good amount of space and legroom, even when filled to the maximum five-passenger capacity.

However, the best feature of the new Camry is the option it provides for environmental consciousness by offering a hybrid version. Currently, the 2018 Camry is available with an all-gas engine, for between $23,495 and $34,950, and with a hybrid engine, for between $27,800 and $32,250.

 

Georgia Tech student, music aficionado. Chronic overthinker.