R. Kelly’s ex-lawyer discusses his guilt or innocence in 2008 trial

R. Kelly. Photo: Instagram/@rkelly

The lawyer who helped singer R. Kelly beat the infamous child pornography trial in 2008 is now speaking publicly on whether the “Bump N Grind” crooner was guilty then — and today.

Ed Genson told the media on Thursday that Kelly was actually guilty of those charges of child pornography and pedophilia. He said the fact that Kelly beat the original trial may have given the “not very bright” Kelly a feeling of invincibility.

“He was guilty as hell!” Genson, 77, told the Chicago Sun-Times from his home in Deerfield, Ill., a prosperous suburb north of Chicago.

In fact, Kelly’s sex drive was so high that Genson ordered Kelly to get anti-libido drugs to help contain his urges. “I’ll tell you a secret,” he told the newspaper. “I had him go to a doctor to get shots, libido-killing shots. That’s why he didn’t get arrested for anything else.”

Genson, now a retired criminal attorney, said at first that he didn’t believe Kelly has done anything “inappropriate” in years.

Genson, who is battling terminal bile duct cancer, told the Sun-Times he doesn’t feel guilty about keeping Kelly out of prison in 2008.

“I didn’t facilitate him. He had already done what he’d done,” Genson said.

“I did facilitate him in the sense I kept him out of trouble for 10 years. I was vetting his records. I listened to them, which ones would make a judge mad.”

Genson did say that he discerned that R. Kelly may be into underage girls when he heard the song “Ignition” on the radio.

“I was riding in the car, listening to a song and said, ‘Are you crazy? This is all I need,’” Genson said aloud to himself. “It’s a song related to a guy driving around in a car with his girlfriend. It was originally a high school instructor in a class teaching people how to drive a car.”

Despite his obvious genius at singing and creating music, Genson said Robert Sylvester Kelly, 52, is “not a very bright person” and has gotten sloppy with his behavior since beating the 2008 charges.

“What he doesn’t understand is this: If you win a case with somebody, they think they’re bulletproof,” Genson surmised. “You’re almost better off, sort of, losing. He thinks he can do whatever the hell he wants. He has done everything he can to hurt himself.”

As rolling out reported previously, R. Kelly is facing 10 counts of aggravated sexual abuse that carries a maximum penalty of seven years in prison for each charge if he’s convicted. It would be tantamount to a death sentence if R. Kelly doesn’t beat the charges this time around.

Terry Shropshire
Terry Shropshire

A military veteran and Buckeye State native, I've written for the likes of the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Atlanta Business Chronicle and the Detroit Free Press. I'm a lover of words, photography, books, travel, animals and The Ohio State Buckeyes. #GoBucks