Skip to content

Nicole M. Jackson explains why Black businesses matter

Nicole M. Jackson owner of Bronzeville Wingz (Photo credit: Eddy “Precise” Lamarre)

Nicole M. Jackson was born and raised in the Bronzeville community on the South Side of Chicago. She has consistently been an active member of her community. Her time as a teacher at McCorkle Elementary and the principal of Hales Franciscan High School demonstrates her love of adding value and giving back to her community. She has always been committed to the revitalization of her community. So when the opportunity to open a business presented itself, she went for it.

Bronzeville Wingz was born from that determination.

Rolling out spoke to Jackson about what inspired her to start Bronzeville Wingz and the importance of running her business in the Black community.

Talk about what inspired you to create Bronzeville Wingz.
Honestly, Bronzeville Wingz was birthed out of God’s promise to me to fulfill the desire of my heart for entrepreneurship. I didn’t choose this path, I was led down it in my obedience to allow God to order my steps.

What does it mean to you to run a small business?
Running a small business means that I am committing to realizing my unlimited earning potential as an entrepreneur. These last two years, I’ve put in long hours and hard labor, with little return. I truly believe that it’s going to pay off. For unto whom much is given, much shall be required.

What are your best selling dishes?
As a wing restaurant, with over 30 sauce flavors, chicken (party and whole wings) is the biggest seller, followed by the jumbo shrimp.

Why is it important for you to be running a Black business in a Black community?
It’s important to me to run a Black business in a Black community because I want to break negative stereotypes about Black restaurants. At Bronzeville Wingz, I strive to provide quality food and excellent customer service at a reasonable price, which rivals national wing franchises.

How has the community embraced you?
I was born and raised in Bronzeville. I’ve been here before it was trendy and I think people respect that. There are a lot of people from the old neighborhood that still live here and they’re just as proud to support me as those who are newer to the community. When you strive to offer the best products and service, people appreciate and embrace that. So, I definitely feel the love.