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Black man forced to spend life in prison for attempting to steal lawn tool

(Photo credit: Kittirat Roekburi/Shutterstock)

The Louisiana Supreme Court is being ridiculed for what some are calling a blatant form of systemic racism. A Black man, Fair Wayne Bryant, was initially convicted in 1997 after he attempted to steal hedge clippers that are used for lawn work, according to The Lens.

Under a Louisiana law that allowed life sentences for habitual offenders, Bryant was sentenced to life in prison at the age of 38. Bryant previously served 10 years in prison for an armed robbery and was jailed for forging a check for $150 in 1989 and a burglary in 1992. He is now 63-years-old.

In an attempt to have his sentenced dismissed, Bryant took his case to the Louisiana Supreme Court. However, the state’s Supreme Court denied a review of Bryant’s case.

The Louisiana Supreme Court consists of five white men and one Black woman, Chief Justice Bernette Johnson. Johnson was the sole dissenter of the court’s decision and the only justice to write an explanation for her decision.

Johnson blasted the decision and called it “excessive and disproportionate to the offense.”

According to Johnson: “Bryant’s incarceration has cost Louisiana taxpayers approximately $518,667 and taxpayers will have paid almost one million dollars to punish Mr. Bryant for his failed effort to steal a set of hedge clippers.”

Johnson viewed Bryant’s incarceration as another form of racial discrimination that has plagued the Black community for centuries. She compared his case to Pig Laws, which was enacted following the Civil War to force Blacks into servitude for stealing minor items.

“Pig Laws were largely designed to re-enslave African Americans,” Johnson wrote. “This man’s life sentence for a failed attempt to steal a set of hedge clippers is grossly out of proportion to the crime and serves no legitimate penal purpose.”