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anatomy of a dogfight

anatomy of a dogfight

 

The term “dogfight” truly is not a fair label for the sadistic “sport.”
As if the canines arm-wrestle and execute flying
clotheslines and full nelsons until their opponent taps out.
Dogfights usually involve pitting dogs against each other inside a
cage, while spectators cheer and place bets – the
results often being one dog being critically wounded and sustaining
massive bleeding due to punctured and torn flesh.
Because dog fighting is a felony in 48 states, the owners don’t seek
medical treatment and kill the dying dog. The most
common way of doing so is shooting the dog. In a recent Virginia
indictment, incidents of hanging, electrocution, drowning
and slamming a dog to death were cited.
Dogfights are nothing new nor are they race specific. They’ve existed
since canines were initially domesticated.
Dogfighting was commonplace in early America, and wasn’t outlawed until
the 20th century. The most commonly used
breed is the American pit bull terrier. To test the ferociousness of
the dog, “bait animals” are often used, usually cats, rabbits
or smaller dogs.
Although, some may argue that dogfighting is no different than hunting
and should be legalized, this multimillion-dollar
subcultural pastime is also a cesspool for a host of illegal
activities. Because such large bets are placed on the fights,
spectators
often carry guns. Drug transactions are also common during these
events.
If you have any knowledge or suspect a dogfighting ring is going on in
your community, contact your local police department. -adam jones