jerry stackhouse – on the rebound

photo by steed media service

Small Forward, Dallas Mavericks

After posting the best record in the NBA in 2007, the Dallas Mavericks
entered the playoffs with a 67-15 record, and as the odds-on favorites
to be crowned world champions. However, the steadfast Mavericks were
defeated in the first round by the Golden State Warriors in what became
one of the biggest upsets in the history of the NBA. Although the
defeat was disheartening, Maverick’s forward Jerry Stackhouse believes
that the team will re-establish themselves as championship contenders
in 2008.

“We were all disappointed about having a great
regular season and then getting eliminated in the first round,”
Stackhouse says. “It was a huge blow, but we have to move on. In this
game, you have to take the good with the bad. So we’re going to go out
this year and see what happens.”

The Mavericks came within six games of breaking the all-time record for
wins in an NBA season. But with the media frenzy that surrounded the
historic run, the team lost focus once the playoffs arrived.

“We kind of faded when the playoffs came around because we spent a lot
of energy chasing the record,” Stackhouse says. “This season, we’re
going to relax and play the game without being distracted by the media
hype. We’re focused on being ready to play in late April and May.”

To prepare for the 2008 season, Stackhouse decided to enhance his
workout regimen during the summer. “I had to do different things to get
ready for this season,” the 12-year veteran says. “As I get older, I
realize that I have to put in more time to workout in the off-season. I
spent a lot of mornings on the track and I also ran on the beach to
build endurance. Right now, I feel stronger than I ever have before.”

Stackhouse has also made some powerful moves outside of basketball.
Since 2002, his Triple Threat Foundation has raised thousands of
dollars for research, care and awareness of diabetes in minority
communities.

“I’ve always supported the fight against diabetes,” he says. “I lost
two sisters to the disease and my parents live with it today. It’s a
big problem in our community and I spend a lot of time educating those
who don’t know much about it.” –amir shaw

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