Harold Camping predicts Christ will return on May 21, 2011.

Judgment Day is just a few days away. Christ will return on May 21, 2011, according to Harold Camping, founder of We Can Know radio.

Camping has been spreading the word about the final days via his Christian Network (that consists of a radio station and companion website), www.wecanknow.com.

We Can Know is the organization behind a series of biblical billboards that bear the date of the Rapture. The organization’s philosophy is that, “We can know something about how God will behave in the future by looking at how He has behaved in the past (Hebrews 13:8). Since He has given advance notice of the precise timing for judgment in the past, we should not be surprised that He is revealing the timing of the end today.”

The We Can Know end of the world campaign has included bumper stickers, pamphlets and even a few mainstream interviews to get the message out.

Follower Kevin Brown said to NPR that God has told him to spread the word about May 21, 2011. “People need to know,” Kevin Brown told NPR, “and God commands us to share the Gospel about the end of the world. He says if we do not share the Gospel then their blood will be on our hands, whether they believe or not. God’s been moving me to do this.”

Camping arrived at the date by the Good Book, which he says predicts that the Rapture is to occur 7,000 years after God’s first warning about the flood. Camping said the flood happened in 4990 B.C., on what would have been May 21 on today’s calendar.

One day equals 1,000 years to God, and God gave Noah one week of warning. And thus, there is a 7,000-year gap between Noah’s flood and the Rapture, bringing us to May 21, 2011.

Not everyone believes the clock will run out on May 21. The American Vision organization points out that Camping initially said the end of the world would occur in 1994.

“In spite of the failure of his 1994 Rapture prediction, Harold Camping is predicting May 21, 2011, as the date the Rapture will take place,” the organization states. “American Vision is so confident that Camping is wrong, we are holding our National Prophecy Conference just a few weeks after his predicted rapture date.”

Judgment Day is also a great week to throw a party, according to the American Atheists, who do not believe in God. The Atheists are hosting a Rapture after-party to prove that Camping is wrong. –zondra hughes

Deputy Editor, Rolling Out