UCLA coaches want to drop charges against Diddy?

Photo Credit: Watch What Happens Live's Instagram (@bravowwhl)
Photo Credit: Watch What Happens Live’s Instagram (@bravowwhl)

Diddy found himself in boiling water this week when he got into a fight with UCLA coach Sal Alosi and was subsequently charged with three counts of assault with a deadly weapon, one count of making terroristic threats and one count of battery. But now a report claims UCLA coaches want the charges against Diddy dropped.

As previously reported, sources have claimed that the fight between Diddy and Alosi occurred after Diddy allegedly witnessed Alosi bullying his son, Bruins defensive player Justin Combs, during practice. Diddy later claimed that he acted in self-defense.

According to TMZ, sources say that after the fight, all of the coaches came together and agreed to just let the incident go. However, an intern called the police and after cops saw a video of the fight, they arrested Diddy.

Head coach Jim Mora doesn’t want a criminal prosecution against Diddy. However, the interns who were allegedly threatened by Diddy during the altercation could push forward with the case if they choose, but if Mora goes against it, they will likely follow his lead.

Sources say all of the Bruins coaches regret that the argument between Alosi and Diddy escalated into a fight. Although they’re not fond of Diddy, they don’t want this case to turn into a high-profile court battle because it would bring the school bad press. Instead, they just want Diddy out of their hair for good.

Unfortunately for Diddy, the case will go to the L.A. County D.A. for felony review next week and, thanks to the video, the D.A. could choose to prosecute the mogul without the help of victims.

We’re going to keep our eyes on this case and see how it goes, but it looks like both sides just want to put all of this behind them.

 

Nicholas Robinson
Nicholas Robinson

I'm a lover of quirks and writing compelling pieces for my readers.

Subscribe to our mailing list

* indicates required