‘Atlanta Monster’ producer Donald Albright shares his playbook for fatherhood

Donald Albright has carved his lane in the music industry and as the producer of the hit podcast, “Atlanta Monster.”

But he’s also a father of two.

Albright recently shared his playbook for fatherhood.

What legacy are you leaving for your children and the children of your community?
A legacy of power and positivity. I want to show my kids and those in the community that they are already powerful, that they can work for themselves, create and own something, and that they can be successful without shortcuts.

How would you describe your Fatherhood culture?
It’s based on and comes from love. I have daughters and they need to know what if feels like to be loved unconditionally so they don’t ever mistake something lesser for the real thing.

From a father’s perspective, what two books would you recommend every child read?
Rich Dad, Poor Dad and Black Privilege.

Why is it important to expose children to education and valuable skills?

Without education and/or skill you have no shot at being successful. Children need to feel the sense of accomplishment that comes throughout the learning process.

As a father and a life coach, describe your playbook.

The playbook is about love, respect and positive reinforcement. Girls need to be more than pretty and boys more than strong. I use everything opportunity as a teachable moment to discuss being independent, proud, resilient, compassionate, etc.

Which fatherhood experiences have taught you the most about yourself?
My oldest daughter (Kai) has Autism Spectrum Disorder. Raising a child with a disability is an experience that teaches me how to be a better, more patient, and more understanding father, and person in general.

What insightful advice would you suggest about building a network?
Don’t build it with friends, build it with like-minded people who you find impressive in ways that you are not.

Why should you read every day?

Acquiring knowledge is a never ending journey. The world is changing every day, so you have to keep up and always try to get better.

Name one life lesson that no one taught you, but should have.
I could have been much better with money and credit in my earlier years but I don’t come from money so no one was there to tell me what to do with it. My parents learned the hard way and so did I. I’ll break the cycle.

How important is keeping your word?
It’s extremely important in business and in your personal life. It shows what type of character you have.

When it comes to protecting yourself at all times, physically and mentally, what would you tell your children?

Like my parents told me, never let anyone put their hands on you, but in this day and age, we have to prepare kids mentally and emotionally to deal with cyber bullying, etc. I talk to my kids about their emotions rather than tell them how they should or shouldn’t feel. They need to develop healthy habits of expression and not hold things in.

What advice would you give on being responsible for your own dreams?
No one can accomplish anything for you so you have to have the drive to realize your dreams, and be determined enough to stay on the path. You also have a responsibility to go after your own dreams, not adopt someone else dream as your own. Dreams are personal and exclusive to the dreamer.

How does following your spiritual values help you in life? 

I follow what is right and trust my moral judgement. Do what is right for the right reasons.

Share one of your fondest memories you’ve experienced with your father, grandfather or father figure.

Walking on the roof of an unfinished house that he was building. I was probably 6 years old, so I don’t recommend you allow your kids to do this. I also worked some summers sweeping up his construction sites. This showed me 2 things… 1. How hard my dad worked, and  2. That physical labor was not for me.

Why is writing down your fatherhood goals for life so important? 

I actually don’t write them down, because they are so fresh in my head every day. My most valued goal is to raise young ladies that have self worth. You can go anywhere from there.

 

A.R. Shaw
A.R. Shaw

A.R. Shaw is an author and journalist who documents culture, politics, and entertainment. He has covered The Obama White House, the summer Olympics in London, and currently serves as Lifestyle Editor for Rolling Out magazine. Follow his journey on Twitter @arshaw and Instagram @arshaw23.

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