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Gabrielle Union to produce and star in Netflix film inspired by Black author

Photo credit: BANG Media

Gabrielle Union will star in and produce The Perfect Find, the movie adaptation of the best-selling book of the same name by Tia Williams.

The 47-year-old actress is set to take on the leading role in the movie adaptation of the best-selling book of the same name by Tia Williams and Gabrielle will also produce the film through her production company, I’ll Have Another.

Gabrielle will play the heroine, beauty journalist Jenna Jones, whose complicated relationship with her boss Darcy, becomes even more complex when she starts dating Darcy’s son.

Confidential Films’ Jeff Morrone, Tommy Oliver and Codie Elaine Oliver will also be producing, alongside Stuart Ford’s AGC Studios, while Leigh Davenport has adapted the book for the screen.

Meanwhile, Gabrielle recently secured the rights to turn the All Boys Aren’t Blue, the memoir of LGBTQ+ activist George M. Johnson into a TV series.

Gabrielle said in a statement: “Queer black existence has been here forever yet rarely has that experience been shown in literature or film and television. Being a parent to a queer-identifying daughter has given me the platform to make sure that these stories are being told in a truthful and authentic way and George’s memoir gives you the blueprint for that and more.

“What I love about this book is that it not only offers a space for queer kids of color to be seen and heard but it also offers those who see themselves outside of that standpoint to be held accountable and help them better understand what it takes to truly have acceptance with someone who is considered other.”

In the book, George explores his “childhood and adolescence” while he was growing up in New Jersey, as well as “his college years attending an HBCU in Virginia.”

The memoir also details memories from “getting his teeth kicked out by bullies at age five,” to his first sexual experience and the challenge of “growing up under the duality of being black and queer.”