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200K Georgia voters wrongly removed from rolls, report states

Black Voters (Photo Credit: Rolling Out)

Nearly 200,000 citizens in Georgia were wrongly removed from the voting rolls in the last election, according to a study that was released on Wednesday, Sept. 02, 2020.

Experts conducted a study called “Advanced Address List Hygiene,” a method of residential address verification that was paid for by the nonpartisan journalism group, Palast Investigative Fund.

The experts concluded that, of the 313,000 people removed from Georgia’s voting roll, nearly 200,000 were wrongly purged. “We found 198,351 Georgia voters who supposedly moved from their registration addresses who, in fact, have not moved at all, and therefore were wrongly purged, a 63.3% error rate,” Palast Investigative Fund wrote.

Palaste then forwarded their findings to the American Civil Liberties Union of Georgia.

The latest report gives further credence to former gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams and thongs of others’ vociferous outcries of flagrant voting irregularities, if not outright voter sabotage.

The ACLU of Georgia told CNN that the method the state chose to maintain the voting rolls were “prone to tremendous error.”

“On the one hand, I was deeply saddened and on the other side, not entirely surprised,” said Andrea Young, executive director of the ACLU of Georgia.

Furthermore, Young said Georgia chose a more expensive method that’s less reliable than normal procedures.

“The real takeaway from this is the state of Georgia is using a methodology for maintaining its voter rolls that is both more expensive and less accurate than what industry would use to maintain a high-quality mailing list,” Young said.

CNN reached out Georgia’s Secretary of State’s office for comment. Not surprisingly, there was no response by press time.