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Hidden chambers in King Tut’s tomb may hold mummy of Nefertiti

Queen Nefertiti (Photo Credit: Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities)

Queen Nefertiti (Photo credit: Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities)

Egyptian archaeologists have revealed what may be the greatest find of the 21st century. A radar scan has shown two hidden chambers in the tomb of Egyptian Pharaoh Tutankhamen, popularly known as King Tut. The chambers are showing organic matter inside, which many scientists are theorizing is the tomb of Queen Nefertiti. Nefertiti has been acknowledged as one of the most beautiful women of the ancient world.

“It could be the discovery of the century. It’s very important for Egyptian history and the history of the world,” Antiquities Minister Mamdouh al-Damaty said at a press conference.

Pharaoh Tutankhamen or King Tut (Photo credit: Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities)

Pharaoh Tutankhamen or King Tut (Photo credit: Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities)

King Tut was the son of the Pharaoh Akhenaten and Queen Nefertiti who had a tumultuous reign.  Akhenaten ruled Egypt for 17 years and was killed for his belief and promotion of the worship of Aten as opposed to the worship of multiple gods. Worship of Aten was the first attempt at monotheism in the ancient world and came before Judaism, Christianity and Islam. Because of his beliefs, Akhenaten and his wife Nefertiti were murdered by an Egyptian general named Horemheb. After the murder of the pair, Tutankhamen was made Pharaoh at the age of 10. His original name was Tutankhaten, which meant “Living image of Aten.” Historians and Egyptologists have stated that after the death of Akhenaten, all worship of Aten was outlawed and his son’s name was changed to Tutankhamun. This was done to re-establish the powerful priesthood of the Egyptian god Amon who suffered a reduction in power and authority under Akhenaten’s reign.

King Tut died under mysterious circumstances when he was in his late teens. His tomb was discovered in 1922 and more than 4,500 items of gold and pottery were discovered untouched for thousands of years. Further radar scans will be made of the hidden chambers on March 31, 2016, but there is no word yet on when the chambers will be opened.