White woman takes credit for inventing bonnets, retreats after Twitter beating

NiteCap (Image source: Instagram – @nitecapco)

Black Twitter collapsed from hilarity when a White woman claimed she invented the sleep bonnet called NiteCap that she is audaciously selling for an exorbitant $100 each.

Based on the torrential downpour of angry responses, Black women could not believe the audacity of a White woman, Sarah Marantz Lindenberg, claiming she alone conceptualized the type of hair covering that Black women have been sporting since Abraham Lincoln was alive – and long before that.

Moreover, Twitter points out that Lindenberg is pawning the product off for the retail price of $98 when you can quickly snatch the item off of a Family Dollar store shelf for under five bucks.

Lindenberg explains to Fashion Magazine how she came up with NiteCap idea:

“I was preparing for my wedding and like a lot of brides, wanted everything to be perfect. My skin was breaking out, and I have quite long hair,” she recalls. “A dermatologist recommended that I sleep with my hair pulled back. Another physician recommended I try silk scarves and I had fun playing around with them, but they didn’t stay on.”

According to the company’s website, “During her pregnancy with twin girls, Sarah was required to go on bed rest – allowing her time to grow the idea of silk sleepwear for hair. She was inspired by the delicate benefits of this luxurious fabric along with the rich history of hair wrapping.”

“My concept came out of a problem that needed solving. It inspired me to create something of my own,” she said to Fashion Magazine. “After much consideration, conceptualization, brainstorming and borderline obsessive research, I literally measured the heads of every person I interacted with,” Lindenberg offered.

 

Black Twitter says the problem with Lindenberg’s discovery is the same one that Christopher Columbus encountered when he said he discovered America: someone had already been there, done that and claimed ownership of it.

For this reason, Twitter pounded Lindenberg and the company manufacturing the product into oblivion. After the roar of disapproval became defeaning, Lindenberg had to backtrack her invention claims.

 

 

After hours of enduring the backlash, NiteCapCo and Lindenberg hastily released an apology of sorts:

But the backpedaling did not prompt Black Twitter to cease and desist from calling Lindenberg out for claiming that she spent years of intense research on hair bonnets. They believe even a cursory glance on the topic would have revealed the historical context of hair coverings Black women have sported for centuries.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Terry Shropshire
Terry Shropshire

A military veteran and Buckeye State native, I've written for the likes of the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Atlanta Business Chronicle and the Detroit Free Press. I'm a lover of words, photography, books, travel, animals and The Ohio State Buckeyes. #GoBucks



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