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Lord Jamar on white rappers: ‘You are guests in the house of hip-hop’

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Brand Nubian member Lord Jamar has come under fire for his controversial views regarding hip-hop, masculinity and homosexuality numerous times over the past few months and several times throughout his 20-plus year career. But the outspoken rhymer does not hold back, and in a recent interview with VladTV, Jamar was asked about Seattle rapper Macklemore and his critically acclaimed song “Same Love.” The song offers a message of understanding toward the LGBT community and examines homophobic attitudes in hip-hop, but according to Jamar, Macklemore —  who is white — has no business speaking on homophobia in hip-hop because he isn’t black.

“OK, white rappers, you’re coming to this almost as a guest,” Lord Jamar stated. “OK, matter of fact you are guests in the house of hip-hop. Just because you have a hit record doesn’t give you the right, as I feel, to voice your opinion. White rappers, those of y’all who really studied the culture, that truly love hip-hop and all that, keep it real with yourself — you know this is a black man’s thing. We started this. This is our s—. We’ve allowed you — those of you who’ve proved your skill and all that — we’ve allowed you to come in and kick your s–t, make yourself known. You know what I mean? And if you have enough respect for the culture we f–k with you. But don’t push it too far.”

Jamar also said that he believes hip-hop isn’t homophobic, but he has a problem with Macklemore pushing what Jamar feels is a gay agenda.

“Yeah, I say rap is gay friendly,” Jamar says. “Making a song like that is like feeling that you have the same footing as any other hip-hop artist and, to me, you don’t. You don’t. Like I can’t go to somebody else’s house and even though they let me wear their clothes and eat their food, that’s not my house. That’s their house. And I can’t get so comfortable in their house that I feel like I can now start talking house politics. To me when people like Macklemore come out with songs like that, I know he loves hip-hop and all that, but he’s trying to push an agenda that him as a white man feels is acceptable.”

Brand Nubian came under fire in the early 1990s for lyrics that were perceived as homophobic. Jamar also made headlines earlier this year when he blasted hip-hop star Kanye West for wearing a “skirt” during his performance at the “12-12-12” Hurricane Sandy benefit in December 2012.