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Actor Hosea Chanchez blasts Black celebrities for hosting parties during pandemic

Hosea Chanchez (Image source: Instagram – @hoseachanchez)

Sometimes it’s hard to believe that we’re in the middle of a pandemic by the way clubs and parties seem to stay filled. Many celebrities like Lil Wayne, Bow Wow, Meek Mill and Gucci Mane have been called out for spearheading some of those events as they are featured as the main attraction. Over the weekend, actor Hosea Chanchez, the former star of “The Game,” took to Twitter and called out his counterparts for their dismissal of human life as they chase the bag.

He tweeted: “Black Celebrities, Restaurant, Club, Hookah & Strip Club owners, Etc – WAKE THE FK UP! Stop leading your people to the slaughter at the hands of this virus to gain profit and service your EGO! You are facilitating MASS extinction in OUR communities. THIS MUST STOP.”

With numbers steadily rising throughout the United States and nearly 420,000 deaths related to COVID-19 so far, one might think staying inside wouldn’t require that much common sense or thought. Chanchez fired off another barrage of tweets holding celebrities’ collective feet to the fire, adding, “Accountability lies beyond Governors & Governments when it comes to protecting OUR people. WE must be responsible for our Heath & families [sic] safety. MASS extinction from SUPER SPREADER events is at the hands of our OWN people. Stop this madness, protect US all & STAY yo a–inside!”

The actor didn’t leave all the blame with the celebrities either and held the people venturing out to these establishments accountable as well.

“To the patrons of these places, these ‘celebrities’ hosting those events don’t give two s—- about YOU or your family. They are only there to make money, spread the virus, feed their egos, and go back to their mansions with premium healthcare. THIS IS A TRAP!”

Hopefully, Chanchez’s message is heard and followed because more than 25.2 million people have been diagnosed with COVID-19 in the United States alone to date, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.