Rolling Out

K.C. Wilbourn-Snapp fights injustice with A Seat at My Sister’s Table

K.C. Wilbourn-Snapp is a turnaround specialist in the industries of education, corrections, and non-profits.  She is responsible for violence interruption and program facilitation in the Richmond City County Jail and has provided engagement for low-to-maximum security classified inmates in correctional facilities in Boston, Bishopville, and Henrico.  This work and passion came only after becoming justice involved.


A native of Detroit, she has an undergraduate degree in Political Science from Spelman College in Atlanta, and advanced degrees in Educational Leadership and Curriculum and Instruction from Wayne State University in Detroit, Michigan.  Currently, she is completing her dissertation at Education at Eastern Michigan University, where she is currently completing her Ph.D. in Education Leadership.  


K.C. is a motivational speaker and trainer who succeeds in personal development strategies, self-help, and systems thinking.  She serves as the Chief Operations Officer for the Detroit Association of Black Organizations where she has been instrumental in program development, supporting low-to-moderate income families with social determinants of health, and the fund development and management of more than $5-million.  She has served on committees that advance agency around health disparities for underserved communities and has worked closely as a liaison between the community and local government.  Her work for the community has included Day of Outrage protests to expose businesses who have sold substances to underage children, No Menthol Sunday, and benevolence to those in need.

As a business owner, she is a Virginia-based vendor servicing correctional facilities through her own non-profit, A Seat at My Sister’s Table, an organization whose mission is to serve women and girls of color who have been exposed to sexual and societal trauma to include molestation and incarceration.  She serves on the board of Save a Girl, Save a World and has recently held a one-year appointment to the Adventiv Advisory Board, a subsidiary of Securus Technologies.  She is a member in good standing of the Order of the Eastern Star, Capstone #32, The Daughters, and auxiliary of the Shriners, and Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Inc.


K.C. lives by the mindset that, “in life, we are halfway through, but we are but halfway done,” which is a reminder that the lessons of life and its journey is never finished.

What are your responsibilities and why did you select your career?

I serve as the Chief Operations Officer for the Detroit Association of Black Organizations where she has been instrumental in program development, supporting low-to-moderate income families with social determinants of health, and the fund development and management of more than $5-million. 

As a business owner, I am contracted to provide violence interruption and services for hard-to-program inmates in correctional facilities.

I have demonstrated tremendous resolve against adversity with resilience and a level of faith that is unwavering.

What thoughtful or encouraging piece of advice would you give to your younger self?

I would tell my younger self that the destiny is the journey and along the way, there will be some great gifts that come from valley moments.

Why is it important for women of color to work in leadership roles and decision-making capacities?

It is important for women of color to be at the table to advance the opportunities of ourselves and each other.

If you could thank any Black woman for her contributions to history and society, who would it be and why? 

It would be my mother, Evelyn Mann, an educator of 43 years who laid the foundation for my passion for education and helping children; and also Glenda Gill, who has been a pioneer.

Why is it important for more experienced Black women to reach back and help younger women of color?

It is important, because it sustains the path for progression.  We are mandated by the sacrifices of our ancestors to reach back and leave the window open and the ladder down.

Share three career highlights.

a)  Serving on a paid board in 2023 for Aventiv Technologies, a subsidiary of Securus Technologies which is owned by Detroit Pistons owner Tom Gores; (b) My second career highlight is securing more than $3,000,000 in grants in 2024;  (c) My third career highlight is being an authority in effective corrections space as a civilian.

As a successful woman in business, what is your greatest or proudest achievement?

My proudest achievement will always be my career as a mother to one son, Mainza Snapp II.  I have been blessed to raise a son who is a Morehouse graduate, a Mason, a member of Kappa Alpha Psi, a police officer in Detroit, and a father.

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