Skip to content

New York officials allow developer to segregate condo and create ‘poor door’ for residents

poordoor

City officials in New York allowed a developer to segregate a high-rise condo between rich and poor. According to reports by New York Post, developers of Extell, a condo on the Upper West Side, got the Department of Housing Preservation and Development to approve a separate entrance for poorer residents.

The developers of the 33-story condo took advantage of New York’s Inclusionary Housing Program that gives generous tax breaks to developers who allow a certain number of low-income residents to rent from their location. The developers reserved the first four floors to residents who earn $50,000 or less.

However, those who earn $50,000 or less will have to enter through another door. Their windows will face the street while the richer residents will have waterfront views of the Hudson River. Also, poorer residents will not have access to the building’s gym and other amenities.

Some in the New York assembly spoke out against the development. There should be an investigation on how developers were able to convince the Department of Housing Preservation and Development to give a tax break for a venture that openly practices segregation through the use of city funds.



5 Comments

  1. Shameful on July 23, 2014 at 11:10 am

    Damn, when did earning $50K become low-income or qualify you for being “poor” even in NY??????

    • Mickl on July 23, 2014 at 7:05 pm

      Ditto.. & I thought I was doing good making 52k.. Didn’t realize I was poor

  2. ruth on July 23, 2014 at 2:45 pm

    I wonder if it’s just a matter of the more you pay the more extras you get

  3. peppercorns on July 23, 2014 at 9:02 pm

    This is not a segregation issue,…I know plenty of white folks who make a lot less then 50k a year, including me…lol

    • TSquare on July 24, 2014 at 10:59 am

      It is a segregation issue…..it may not be racial but economic segregation is just as bad. When I was making $40 I didn’t consider myself poor and surely didn’t think I should be discriminated against by having to use a separate entrance to a place where I pay rent and utilities. Imagine how that makes a person feel when they are doing well for themselves but are made to feel like they are not good enough.
      Also, I think they should be allowed to use the other amenities, but at a price, not just for free.