Photographer Robert Williams III channels creativity through his camera

Robert Williams III (Photo credit: Shiloh Ricks @lobehindlenses)

Robert Williams III has expanded the boundaries of creative photography by using specific camera techniques. As a teenager, the Milwaukee native was intrigued by photography, but it wasn’t until he was 24 years old that he purchased his first camera and began to take the art of photography seriously.

Williams currently lives in Atlanta, where he has been inspired by the city’s rich Black culture. “Capturing beauty is much easier now that I can see myself and my people in a positive light,” he said.


Williams has merged his love for photography and entrepreneurship to establish Printable Ink LLC., an on-demand screen printing and fulfillment company for brands and influencers, where he serves as a brand strategist.

Website: https://printable.ink


Social media handle: @rwiiiproductions

One thing cool about you: I’m a creative nerd.

Favorite guilty pleasure: Venti Caramel Macchiato

Favorite hobby: Top Golf

Have you done a photoshoot where you hated the images, but the public loved them?

There was a particular shoot when I was overthinking the outcome of the photos that I saw on my camera versus how they would translate on the computer and prints. I pushed through the photoshoot anyway, and the end results were positive. The client was amazed and had the photos enlarged to be framed for their event. I was taught a very valuable life lesson: trust the process, and stay optimistic even when things don’t appear that way in the beginning.

Do you believe that being creative has lost some of its luster?

I do agree and disagree. In a sense, being creative is so saturated that being “a creative” could lose its authenticity. Being creative is so subjective. Anyone can be creative because there isn’t a standard, though being labeled “creative” means that you have mastered the technical aspect of your field of expertise.

Would you describe yourself as a creative?

In the past, I’ve wrestled with describing myself as creative. Since partnering and teaming up with others on numerous projects over the years, I have since embraced my creative direction through the positive results I’ve had, [and] also with those I’ve helped to succeed with my creativity.

Who do you consider to be great photographers?

DeWayne Rogers, Jay Wiggs, Casey McDaniel-Wright.

How do they inspire you?

I am inspired in many different ways. Though consistently I am inspired by these photographers because of their ability to create and teach and sustain in a business model that’s tough to succeed in.

What’s your preferred medium, film vs. digital?

I prefer digital just because that’s what I have the most experience in. I wouldn’t mind shooting film when I get my studio back up and running though.

How about color vs. black and white?

I prefer color over black and white because, to me, more emotions are captured in a color image, especially with vivid, well-lit image scenes that tell a story.

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